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Coexistence between Camlids & Equestrians

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Coexistence between Camlids & Equestrians

Postby norcallama » Sun Jan 03, 2010 6:50 pm

Planning on a trip in the spring of 2011 starting in Tahatchapi and ending in Tahoe I understand here is a rub going through the N.P.'s regarding Llamas in the High Country and that I need to submit special a special request to pass through the Parks
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Postby grayhair » Thu Jan 07, 2010 11:39 am

Norcallama
My encounters with llamas haven't been any problem but others have had serious and even life threatening encounters. Most horses are beyond reason when it comes to llamas. Just giving the right of way might not be enough and it may be necessary to move way off the trail if you see or hear horses.
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Postby llamalady » Thu Jan 07, 2010 6:29 pm

You will need a regular wilderness permit for the point where you enter your first wilderness area going northbound. I would think that would be Golden Trout or perhaps Domeland. You apply to the national forest district that has jurisdiction over that wilderness. Be sure to tell the rangers that you are using llamas and that it gets written on your permit. You don't want some backcountry ranger you encounter reacting negatively to your permit. The only restriction on llamas on the PCT is in Yosemite. There the PCT coincides with the High Sierra trail for about ten miles, from Rafferty Creek junction to Glen Aulin High Sierra Camp. As of last year, they are now requiring llama users to obtain a special permission from the superintendent in order to use that piece of the PCT. In addition there are several other trails in the park that llamas are not allowed to use, so it is impossible to devise a bypass around this piece of trail.
We obtained this permission and traveled this piece of trail last August. I can provide you with the text of the letter we used to obtain permission as a starting point for you to write your own letter. Give yourself plenty of lead time because this process took us several months to acquire the permission letter from the superintendent.
Normally you just need a permit at your entry point that is good for the whole trail you follow, but Yosemite has chosen to single out llama users and make them jump through hoops. We have had several bad encounters with Yosemite rangers. ( The forgiveness vs. permission rule does not apply to them--they are sticklers for regulations). It is best to just follow the rules they present.
Feel free to contact me at mardav@charter.net
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Cant we all get along

Postby norcallama » Thu Jan 07, 2010 6:42 pm

Have taken extra care to make sure that when we encounter packers and riders to stay clear.
Even post placards up stream and down stream from our camp so as to give ample notice, I have rolled on my Morgan when it was spooked by an Elk go figure any who thanks you for your response and keep the doors open regarding helpful suggestions
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Postby grayhair » Fri Jan 08, 2010 2:52 am

Norcallama
The extra effort you take to post and warn that you have llamas is very much appreciated! Conditioning a horse to llamas is a difficult task and for many impossible. I have heard about some very brave horses who never shy at bears or other wildlife become absolutely terrified when they encounter llamas. You would think that the llama's size would make them less of a threat but who's to know? Good luck on your planning!
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Llamas in the Sierra

Postby Wyethia » Sat Jul 10, 2010 1:43 pm

Norcallama:
Although I don't think the PCT itself is affected, I heard there are some areas that are off limits to llamas due to Big Horn Sheep range on the east side of the crest, and the possibility of transferring diseases between llamas and sheep. It could potentially affect your choices of resupply. I read about this back when I was researching whether I wanted llamas or burros for walk and lead- went with burros so didn't follow up on exact location or whether it is only part of the year.
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