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The myth of the "perfect shelter".

Rants and raves! With the plethora of gear that's out there, why don't you tell us about your gear. Help the community separate the good from the bad.

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The myth of the "perfect shelter".

Postby Corky Corcoran » Mon Jun 05, 2006 8:34 pm

On a longer thru-hike, months, a shelter needs to be able to protect the hiker and his/her equipment from bugs, misty rain,drizzly rain, thunderstorms, hail coming at you sideways, snow, cold, bugs, high winds, sun, and more bugs. It will need to be able to be a place to "hang out" in inclement weather, eat, sleep, and scratch. When there is no chance of changing out equipment, one item will have to do. And the less expensive the better.

As someone who wants to stay warm, dry, sleep, read, eat if necessary, get dressed, pack, and so on in a tent, it takes something more than the "Wisp-and-Wish Aerosol Gowithgawd".

I don't think one can stay dry in a single-wall tent. For short periods, yes, but not for days. Therefore, double-wall. I like enough room for me, my dog, and my "stuff". That's a bit bigger than average, but the dog carries a pack. I may want to heat water, that requires a hanging canister stove or a larger vestibule.

My tent which can do all those things at an acceptable weight is the Euraka Pinnacle 2XTA. Lotsa room, large vestibules. Less than 5 pounds, $115 including shipping. Only minus is the footprint, which is large with the fly staked clear out.
Corky
Poco Loco Solo Sobo Hobo
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Postby karmagurl » Thu Nov 01, 2007 10:26 pm

After ordering my Double Rainbow Tarptent from Henry Shires, at $250, and 2.5 lbs, I have to say, that was the best money I have ever invested. Single wall shelter yes, and if you use the venting capabilities of this tent, you should rarely have a problem with condensation. If you live in say, Washington state, you can order this nice breathable liner for the tent, at a whopping weight sacrifice of 4 oz, and that takes care of any condensation problem you might even think of having.

Would I carry 5 lbs in my pack when I can carry half that? Are you kidding? And yes, the Double Rainbow is a 2 man tent- or a really comfy one man, plus the dog and gear tent. Rated at 3+ seasons, its one tough customer. Plus, it has some great features you will never see on other tents. Check one out sometime- you won't be disappointed!

Thanks Henry Shires- whatta creation! You rock!

KarmaGurl
The more I know, the more I know I don't.
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My Tent Solution - Cheaper was better

Postby Peacemeal » Sun Apr 13, 2008 9:53 am

After going through 2 mid range tents in one season, I opted to try the Wal-mart provided Ozark Mountain "two man packpacker".

What a pleasant surprise! It has a very true 6x5' floor which fits my 5'8'' extremely well. It's 3 lbs weight is great, and with extra water-proofing it holds out the weather remarkably well.

You normally get what u pay for, but at $17.95 this has been a dream come true. I purchased it thinking that if it had to replace twice a season that it would be affordable -- 20 months later my "toy" tent is still going strong!
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Postby wanderinglump » Tue Jan 27, 2009 2:05 pm

I second the Rainbow, except for humid environments like the AT. Yet it did better than expected on that trail for us.
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Postby karmagurl » Sun Feb 21, 2010 4:57 pm

Wandering-- that's why I got the liner for the Double Rainbow...WA state is notorious for constant rain and humidity all year long. The liner helps keep the condensation or rain mist from getting to you or your gear.

I've used my Double Rainbow in every type of weather now you could imagine, and it's one of the better ones for holding out on a snow load, whereas many lesser tents would collapse under the weight.

I also own a Henry Shire's Contrail, which will be my long distance trail tent. I wouldn't carry a 5 lb tent on a dare....The Contrail is 1.5 lbs, all inclusive, and my ground sheet I got from Gossamer Gear- 1.5 oz. At 8 bux for 2 sheets, it's a bargain as well as a weight saver!

I still enjoy using my Double Rainbow, when the conditions warrant it. It's roomy and plenty of room for you and a partner, or you and your pet, as well as gear. Also love the "porch" you can make with your trekking poles on either side of it, to help keep you out of the rain, should you need to cook in your vestibule. Check it out sometime!!

Peace Hikers
KarmaGurl
The more I know, the more I know I don't.
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Postby karmagurl » Sun Feb 21, 2010 5:12 pm

Wandering-- that's why I got the liner for the Double Rainbow...WA state is notorious for constant rain and humidity all year long. The liner helps keep the condensation or rain mist from getting to you or your gear.

I've used my Double Rainbow in every type of weather now you could imagine, and it's one of the better ones for holding out on a snow load, whereas many lesser tents would collapse under the weight.

I also own a Henry Shire's Contrail, which will be my long distance trail tent. I wouldn't carry a 5 lb tent on a dare....The Contrail is 1.5 lbs, all inclusive, and my ground sheet I got from Gossamer Gear- 1.5 oz. At 8 bux for 2 sheets, it's a bargain as well as a weight saver!

I still enjoy using my Double Rainbow, when the conditions warrant it. It's roomy and plenty of room for you and a partner, or you and your pet, as well as gear. Also love the "porch" you can make with your trekking poles on either side of it, to help keep you out of the rain, should you need to cook in your vestibule. Check it out sometime!!

Peace Hikers
KarmaGurl
The more I know, the more I know I don't.
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Postby mister4x5 » Fri Jul 02, 2010 11:16 pm

Karmagurl,

I too have a Rainbow and a Contrail with the GG groung sheet. I'm wondering how you would rate the two for a PCT thru-hike.

Would one tent be better for certain sections of the trail vs. the other. I'm really not sure which tent would be better along the trail so any suggestions would be a great help in deciding what I should do.

Thanks
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Postby Chance09 » Fri Oct 08, 2010 11:51 am

you may want a freestanding tent in the desert because sometimes in high winds you will have a hell of a time keeping stakes in the ground. If you decide to use a tent that is. I carried a 5 by 8 tarp and set it up 4 or 5 times before kennedy meadows.

In the high sierra's i think you'd be better off with a freestanding tent because you never know where you'll be camping or if it'll be rocky.

I used a 5 by 8 tarp and then a lunar solo for the rest starting at kennedy meadows and was more or less satisfied with the choice.
-Chance
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Postby leaftye » Tue Oct 12, 2010 4:18 pm

Chance09 wrote:you may want a freestanding tent in the desert because sometimes in high winds you will have a hell of a time keeping stakes in the ground


That's if you can even get it into the ground. I bent a y-stake near Table Mountain. I ended up cowboy camping. Of course that was the night a cougar decided it wanted to hang out in my campsite all night.

Personally I'm not concerned much about moisture in a single wall tent thanks to my cuben fiber quilt. The only thing that sucks is that when I make an in-tent nature call, my back can get soaked from condensation.
Sir Mix-a-lot
www.eugeneleafty.com
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